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Like Us!
Monday August 15th, 2011
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Next: I-RAVER
NEXT-GEN AND THE HOLOGRAMS



It would seem, that the future is nigh. Technology has progressed exponentially, and nothing is safe from being turned from science-fiction into just science. Even humans themselves.

Advances in electronics has helped musicians and disc jockeys to no end, creating a vast array of new gadgets, hardware, and software with which to create and play music. New generations of artists are throwing themselves onto this new level of creativity and imagination, pushing it to the limits and striving for better. A musician can be overjoyed with what he can now find at his fingertips. But, technology has gone beyond that, into realms that no longer have the need for the musician's fingertips. Welcome to the age of computer-generated Super-Stars.

Scientists have made self-contained programs that can sing, create music, and write lyrics. Now, with holographic imaging even the performing artist can be replaced. Started in Japan, Pop-Stars are now nothing more than 3D projections on a stage. They have sold this technology to the global market. If you thought CG graphics in film were erasing the need for more organic special effects, and are replacing actors, you now have a new fear. Music is being made and performed entirely by computers. Feed the machine information, and out comes a hit song.

Before releasing this to the public across the planet, agencies, corporations, and their lawyers are busy putting together contracts and a new legal-language that will allow them to drop their current human clients. It is easier and cheaper to purchase a computer-generated personality and the necessary gear, than to put up with human artists' growing greed, personality disorders, and drug problems. A hologram can do no wrong, won't get drunk and ruin its reputation, will never sing off key, and can't ask for more money.

The Popular music world is already worried, but now another musical domain is being threatened. The DJ. Disc Jockeys are in demand for various reasons, including technique, song selection, and crowd reading. The machines are now programmed to do just that. They record and analyse crowd reactions and select drum-patters accordingly, are armed with over 1,000,000 songs in their memory banks, mix tracks together perfectly, and can now be present on stage with holographic technology. The fear is setting in, and many humans are dropping the idea of becoming a DJ, drowning themselves in alcohol and drugs to wash away the depression of a passion lost.

A small faction of scientists are also exploring the idea of sexual desire and mechanical sexual performance, in order to keep the all important 'groupie' factor in play. If fans are also created by the possibility of sexual encounter, the music industry wants to make that happen as well. They want to market the perfect Rock-Star.

There is a point when technology replaces hard work, and another point when technology replaces what you've worked hard on.
Previous: LEVEL UP!
Next: I-RAVER
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